War Games

War Games

War Games: Memory, Militarism and the Subject of Play
New York, Bloomsbury, 2019
ISBN: 9781501351150
Amazon UK / Amazon USA

CONTENTS

List of Figures
Notes on Contributors
Acknowledgements

1. Introduction: Studying War and Games
Philip Hammond and Holger Pötzsch

Part I: Militarism and the Gaming Subject

2. Reality Check: Videogames as Propaganda for Inauthentic War
Philip Hammond

3. Playing in the End Times: Wargames, Resilience and the Art of Failure
Kevin McSorley

4. The Political Economy of Wargames: The Production of History and Memory in Military Video Games
Emil Lundedal Hammar and Jamie Woodcock

5. Understanding War Game Experiences: Applying Multiple Player Perspectives to Game Analysis
Kristine Jørgensen

Part II: Playing War, History and Memory

6. Playing the Historical Fantastic: Zombies, Mecha- Nazis and Making Meaning about the Past through Metaphor
Adam Chapman

7. Machine(s) of Narrative Security: Mnemonic Hegemony and Polish Games about Violent Conflicts
Piotr Sterczewski

8. National Memories and the First World War: The Many Sides of Battlefield 1
Chris Kempshall

9. Let’s Play War: Cultural Memory, Celebrities and Appropriations of the Past
Stephanie de Smale

Part III: Wargames/Peacegames

10. The Wargame Legacy: How Wargames Shaped the Roleplaying Experience from Tabletop to Digital Games
Dimitra Nikolaidou

11. Critical War Game Development: Lessons Learned from Attentat 1942
Vít Šisler

12. Simulating War Dynamics: A Case Study of the Game- Based Learning Exercise Mission Z: One Last Chance
Joakim Arnøy

13. Positioning Players as Political Subjects: Forms of Estrangement and the Presentation of War in This War of Mine and Spec Ops: The Line
Holger Pötzsch

14. Afterword: War/Game
Matthew Thomas Payne

Index

‘Hammond and Pötzsch have put together a remarkable collection of essays which at turns surprises, challenges and even provokes the reader … An excellent compendium for an era dominated by war and mediated simulacra of warfare, War Games has brought together some of the cutting-edge scholars working in the emerging discipline of historical gaming to produce a meaningful and important discussion of how war and games are critically and culturally enmeshed in twenty-first-century society.’
– Andrew B.R. Elliott, University of Lincoln

‘The impressive range of perspectives in this collection bring new insight and nuance to the expanding field of war and games.’
– Debra Ramsay, University of Exeter